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Description

Specifications

Ordering Info

Downloads

Description

Path 7

Description

Specifications

Ordering Info

Downloads

Description

Design Features

  • Solves complex problems such as optical alignments and tool center point programming
  • Enables AeroScriptPlus functionality on each controller you deploy
  • Runs multiple AeroScriptPlus programs simultaneously with a single license
  • Includes complex application specific programming that is ready for use

Automation1

The Automation1 AeroScriptPlus feature is part of the user-friendly Automation1 motion control platform, which includes the following:

Optical Alignment Algorithms

The AeroScriptPlus optical alignment algorithms execute searches to align optical and fiber optic devices. Alignment is typically a two-step process.

Step one is detecting initial power. Step two is a peak power search. In the first step, you must detect initial power because it might be necessary for the peak power search routines to have an appreciable quantity of power to start. If you specify a loading position where there is always an appreciable quantity of power reading, then you do not need to do the first step of the alignment process.

The alignment routines can be broken into three categories: initial power searches, peak power searches (where initial power is necessary) and peak power searches (where initial power is not necessary). Initial power searches include the Hillclimb() and SpiralRough() functions. Peak power searches that depend on an initial power reading include the FastAlign and Centroid functions. Peak power searches where initial power is not necessary include Geocenter(), Hillclimb() (in whole window mode) and SpiralFine(). Note: these routines must start at a location that is near the power distribution and must search the area of power distribution to be successful.

Tool Center Point Programming

Tool Center Point Programming (TCP) allows you to create motion programs in part coordinates that are independent of the physical machine configuration. TCP is easily accomplished for 3-axis linear Cartesian X/Y/Z systems, as the position of the tool in part space has a fixed offset relative to the machine axes.

When one or more rotary axes are present, the calculation becomes more complex because there is no longer a fixed relationship between part and machine coordinates. The calculation of machine coordinates from part coordinates requires the application of a rotation matrix.

Automation1 is capable of transforming part coordinates into machine coordinates in real time for actuators with up to six degrees of freedom (three linear, three rotary).

Optical Alignment Routines

Topic
Function
Description
Spiral Search SpiralFine() The SpiralFine function works in a very similar way
to the SpiralRough function, except that it includes
a maximum radius parameter instead of a power
threshold parameter. The algorithm terminates when
this radius is reached, and then the axes return to the
point of the highest power reading.
Spiral Search SpiralRough() The SpiralRough function executes a spiral motion
pattern, sampling the power during the profile, with
the origin of the spiral being the axes coordinates at
the time the command is executed. The algorithm
terminates when the power reading reaches a userdefined threshold.
Centroid Search Centroid1D() The fiber Centroid... functions are a fiber alignment
method that is particularly useful when the power
peak is a plateau or has multiple peaks. Centroid1D(),
Centroid2D() and Centroid3D() will move to the edges
of a power peak and then use this data to identify the
center of the power peak.
Requires first light!
Centroid Search Centroid2D() The fiber Centroid... functions are a fiber alignment
method that is particularly useful when the power
peak is a plateau or has multiple peaks. Centroid1D(),
Centroid2D() and Centroid3D() will move to the edges
of a power peak and then use this data to identify the
center of the power peak.
Requires first light!
Centroid Search Centroid3D() The fiber Centroid... functions are a fiber alignment
method that is particularly useful when the power
peak is a plateau or has multiple peaks. Centroid1D(),
Centroid2D() and Centroid3D() will move to the edges
of a power peak and then use this data to identify the
center of the power peak.
Requires first light!
Intelligent Process Search FastAlign2D() T The FastAlign... functions use an intelligent process
to explore an area and locate the optimized power
location. FASTALIGN can be configured to use
anywhere between two and six axes, and finds a point
where the power reading exceeds a user-defined
threshold. These functions provide simple use in
complex alignments, six-degree-of-freedom alignments
and coordinate alignments across aligners.
Requires first light!
Intelligent Process Search FastAlign3D() T The FastAlign... functions use an intelligent process
to explore an area and locate the optimized power
location. FASTALIGN can be configured to use
anywhere between two and six axes, and finds a point
where the power reading exceeds a user-defined
threshold. These functions provide simple use in
complex alignments, six-degree-of-freedom alignments
and coordinate alignments across aligners.
Requires first light!
Intelligent Process Search FastAlign4D() T The FastAlign... functions use an intelligent process
to explore an area and locate the optimized power
location. FASTALIGN can be configured to use
anywhere between two and six axes, and finds a point
where the power reading exceeds a user-defined
threshold. These functions provide simple use in
complex alignments, six-degree-of-freedom alignments
and coordinate alignments across aligners.
Requires first light!
Intelligent Process Search FastAlign5D() T The FastAlign... functions use an intelligent process
to explore an area and locate the optimized power
location. FASTALIGN can be configured to use
anywhere between two and six axes, and finds a point
where the power reading exceeds a user-defined
threshold. These functions provide simple use in
complex alignments, six-degree-of-freedom alignments
and coordinate alignments across aligners.
Requires first light!
Intelligent Process Search FastAlign6D() T The FastAlign... functions use an intelligent process
to explore an area and locate the optimized power
location. FASTALIGN can be configured to use
anywhere between two and six axes, and finds a point
where the power reading exceeds a user-defined
threshold. These functions provide simple use in
complex alignments, six-degree-of-freedom alignments
and coordinate alignments across aligners.
Requires first light!
Raster Scan Search Geocenter() The Geocenter function executes a raster scan pattern
of user-defined size and records each time the pattern
passes through a userspecified power threshold. Once
the raster scan is completed, the algorithm calculates
the geometric center of all the power distribution
defined by the recorded threshold points.
Local Power Search Hillclimb() The Hillclimb function is used to search in a positive or
negative direction along one axis at a time for a local
power peak. If the peak is not identified in the first
direction, the direction is reversed and the rest of the
axis is explored. Once a peak is found, the algorithm
returns to this position.

Tool Centerpoint Programming

Topic
Description
TCP Machine Tool
Standards
Standards exist in the machine tool industry for
associating linear and rotary axes and defining positive
move directions of all axes. Adhering to these standards
removes uncertainty when anticipating how machine
axes will move in response to motion commanded in part
space.



The positive move directions and the orientation of the
axes in the Part coordinate system are defined per the
right hand rule as shown to the right. The left hand image
is for positive linear convention and the right hand image
is for positive angular convention.
TCP Machine Tool Standards Rotation occurs about a part linear axis per the
relationship shown in the figure to the right. When TCP is
active, the A axis rotates the tool center point about the
part X axis, the B axis rotates the tool center point about
the part Y axis and the C axis rotates the tool center point
about the Z axis.
Machine Configuration To perform TCP kinematic calculations, the controller must know the locations of the tool, part and rotary axes and the configuration of the rotary axes.




Offset Position Configuration
A common approach to establishing machine configuration is to specify offsets between the points of rotation of the rotary axes and the location of the tool and
the part. This configuration mode accommodates the input of coordinates based on their distances from the Part or Tool Tip they are connected to.




Absolute Position Configuration
Another common approach is using the absolute positions of all system elements based on their location in a “World” coordinate frame.
Acceleration Limiting The CoordinatedAccelLimit parameter will stop or slow down path velocity for non-tangent linear moves. The DependentCoordinatedAccelLimit parameter will stop or slow down program velocity for non-tangent rotary axis
moves.




Note: The effect of changing speed on the machining process may prevent the use of Acceleration limiting in applications which require constant surface speed.
Commanded Velocity
Filtering
A low pass IIR filter (TrajectoryIIRFilter) or moving
average FIR filter (TrajectoryFIRFilter) can be applied
to the velocity command of the virtual and/or physical
axes. The filter is applied continuously and will modify the
program path by rounding all of the transitions between
moves, even those that do not exhibit large accelerations.




The positions of the linear servo axes are calculated
from the virtual x/y/z axes and the servo rotary axis
commanded positions. Similar filter settings should be
applied to both virtual x/y/z and physical A/B/C axes to
ensure consistent phasing of commanded position used
to calculate the servo X/Y/Z positions.




Note: Applying a filter to the servo rotary A/B/C axes and
servo X/Y/Z axes will cause the servo X/Y/Z axes to lag behind the servo rotary axis position command.
Path Optimization Lead on/lead off moves or “skywriting” is commonly used
in X/Y applications to ensure the tool is only engaged in
the material at constant speed. The calculation of lead
moves or skywriting sequences is more complex on 3D
shapes as the inserted path geometry cannot cause
a collision between the part and the tool. Normally the
process consists of a lead-off and lead-on move inserted
between two nontangent features. The tool is turned off
before the lead-off at constant surface speed. The path
velocity decelerates to 0 during the lead off move. The
controller moves to the start of the lead-on move, which is
tangent to the next path segment and the system reaches
constant speed during the lead-on move and enable the
tool at the end of the lead-on move.

Dimensions

Ordering Information

Filetype

Option
Compiled AeroScript Library File

File

Option Description
-F1 Optical Alignment Algorithms, Compiled AeroScript Library File
-F2 Tool Center Point Programming, Compiled AeroScript Library File
Note:
  1. To load and run AeroScriptPlus files on your controller, your Automation1-iSMC motion controller must be configured with the -AP1 option.

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